NOMBRE DE LANGUES

Languages in the world: number and observations

The number of languages in the world and general observations

 

Bernard Comrie, Stephen Matthews, Maria Polinsky, The Atlas of languages, Bloomsbury ed., 1997

 

 

In the last decade of the twentieth century, it is estimated that over 6,000 languages are spoken in the world.

 

BASIC WORD ORDER (p.19)

 

SOV

cows grass eat

Hindi/Urdu, Turkish, Japanese, Korean

SVO

cows eat grass

English, Finnish, Chinese, Swahili

OSV

grass cows eat

Kabardian (a language of the northern Caucasus)

OVS

grass eat cows

Hixkaryana (a Carib language of Brazil)

VOS

eat grass cows

Malagasy (an Austronesian language of Madagascar), Tzotzil (a Mayan language of Central America)

VSO

eat cows grass

Classical Arabic, Welsh, Samoan

 

Bernard Comrie, Stephen Matthews, Maria Polinsky, The Atlas of languages, Bloomsbury ed., 1997

Asia

In India the most important Indic languages are Hindi, Urdu (which closely resembles Hindi), (…).(p.15)  Speakers of the Indic languages number well over one billion. (p.16)

 

The Turkic languages are a homogeneous group of about 20 languages, which are for the most part mutually intelligible. (p.18)

 

The Sino-Tibetan family consists of more than 200 languages. (p.22)

 

Oceania

The Papuan languages do not seem to belong to a single family. There are more than 1,000 of these languages. (p.25)

The Australian languages are about 150. (p.26)

* in the Philippines: 70 lg; Indonesia: 200 lg

 

 

Africa

The Niger-Congo languages are over a thousand. (p.26)

 

America

Over a hundred Indian languages are spoken in the United States and Canada,

over three hundred in Mexico and Central America,

and perhaps a thousand in South America. (p.30)

 

 

Observations

 

Europe

Maltese is a Semitic language. (p.28)

 

Africa

In Morocco you have Berber languages: Tachelhit, Tamazight, Riff.

In Algeria: Kabyle and Tamashek in the South. (p.28)

 

Pidgin and creole languages:

In Suriname, you have a language called Sranan or Taki-Taki (‘talkee-talkee’), based on English with numerous Dutch words: it has become the lingua franca. (p.33)

 

In the last decade of the twentieth century, it is estimated that over 6,000 languages are spoken in the world

 

INDO – EUROPEAN (the largest established language family in the world) (p.40)

 

Celtic

Italic

Greek

germanic

Balto-Slavic

Armenian

Albanian

Indo-Iranian

+Tocharian

Anatolian

Scots

Irish

Welsh

Breton

+Latin

 

WEST:

English

German

Dutch

Frisian

Afrikaans

Yiddish

 

BALTIC:

+Old Prussian;

Lithuanian, Latvian

 

 

INDIC: (= Indo-Aryan)+Sanskrit

Hindi/Urdu

Bengali

Punjabi;

 

Sinhalese

Nepali

Bihari

Romany

 

+ Hittite

+ Luwian

 

 

Italian

Spanish

Portuguese

French

Provençal

Romanian

Rhaeto-Romance

Walloon

 

 

 

NORTH:Danish

Norwegian

Swedish

Icelandic

Faroese

SLAVIC: WEST: Polish, Czech , Slovak

Sorbian

 

SOUTH:

BulgarianSerbian/Croatian

Macedonian

Slovenian

 

EAST:

Belarussian

Ukrainian

Russian, ,

 

 

IRANIAN:

+Avestan

Persian

Pashto

Kurdish;

Ossetic,

Baluchi

Tajik

 

 

 

 

 

EAST:

+ Gothic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAKH-DAGHESTANIAN (Caucasus) (p.51)

 

Nakh

Daghestanian

 

Other Caucasian language families: Kartvelian (Georgian, Laz, svan, Chan, Mingrelian), Abkhaz-Adyghean; Indo-European (Ossetic, Armenian) and Turkic (Azerbaijani, Kumyk). (p.51)

NB: There exists a dene-caucasian hypothesis linking the Na-Dene languages of North America with Sino-Tibetan.

DENE-CAUCASIAN (p.52):

  1. Caucasian Yeniseyan (Ket) Sino-Tibetan    Na-Dene

 

 

NB: Udi (also a part of that N-D family) (p.52)

 

BASQUE (related to Caucasian: “It seems the most plausible of the many proposed relatives for Basque.” (p.52)

 

Chechen

Ingush

Tsova-Tush

Tsez

Hunzib

Beshta

Avar

Andi

Chamali

Lak

Dargwa

Lezgian

Tabasaran

Archi

tsakhur

 

 

URALIC

Finno-Ugric

Samoyedic (Siberia)

Yukaghir (Siberia)

Finnic

Lappic

Volgaic

Permian

Ugric

Nenets

Enets

Nganasan

Selkup

Kamas

 

Finnish

Estonian

Saami

Mordvin

mari

Votyak

Komi

Hunugarian

Khanty

mansi

 

 

 

TYPOLOGY of LANGUAGES (p.53)

Four basic types of languages can be observed acoording to the word structure (morphology): isolating, agglutinative, fusional (inflectional) and polysynthetic.

The classification is based on three essential criteria:

1 does a word divide into a smaller meaningful parts (morphemes)?

2 If so, are the boundaries between the component parts clear?

3 Does each component express a single meaning?

·      If the answer with the first qustion is negative, we are dealing with an ISOLATING language, where even grammatical concepts are expressed by separate words which do not divide into smaller units. Chinese and Vietmanese are both examples of this type; in Mandariin ta bu hui yong dao chi fan translates liteally as ‘he no can use knife eat rice’.  (He doesn’t know how to eat with a knife.)

·      In an agglutinatiing language, words divide into smaller units (morphemes) with clear boundaries betwen them, and each grammatical meaning is expressed by a separate morpheme; for example, in Japanese tabe-sase-rare-ru transmates as “can cause someone to eat”; tabe means “eat”, sase “cause”, rare “can” and ru mùarks the present tense.

·      in an inflectional language, the boundaries between morphemes are fuzzy, and morphemes can express more than one grammatical meaning, as in Latin pluribus where the ending -ibus indicates both plurality and either dative or ablative case (as in the federal motto e pluribus unum “out of many, one”).

·      In a polysynthetic language, several morphemes are pt together to form complex words which can function as a whole sentence, as in Chukchi (…) “1st person-big-head-ache-ing” (I have a fierce headache”).

 

Whistled speech (p.139) is found in the Americas, in the Canary Islands, France, Africa, Nepal and elsewhere.

 

Languages of South America: approximatively 600 distinct languages (p.135).

 

ESKIMOS speak INUKTITUT (?).

 

Boutanès:

Pho-Chu (pére); Mo-Chu (mére)

 

NOMBRES

Philippines: tagalog: nombres normaux; argent: espagnol; gros nombres: anglais

Word order type

Example languages

 

 

??

asidim-ai

cover one object once

asidim-o

keep on covering one object

i-asidim-ai

cover more than one object once

i-asidim-uti

cover more than one object in separate actions

(Geo, 3, 2013)

Kenneth Katzner, The languages of the world, Routledge 2002

 

Language families of the world (p.2)

 

Family

subgroup

branch

major languages

minor languages

Indo-European

Germanic

Western

English, German, Yiddish, Dutch, Flemish, Afrikaans

Frisian, Luxembourgian,

Faroese (not mentioned)

 

Romance

 

Italian, F, Sp, Port, Romanian

Catalan, Provençal, Rhaeto-Romanic, Sardinian, Moldovan

 

(p.12) Germanic languages

Yiddish and Luxembourgian are offshoots (sic) of German (…).

 

 

Katzner Kenneth, The languages of the world, Routledge 2002

(p.15) The modern Slavic (or Slavonic) languages number eleven: Russian, Ukainian, Belorussian, Polishn Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovenian, Macedonian and Sorbian (Lusatian). Tspeakers o the Slavic languages number about 275 million.

 

(p.15) In India the most important Indic languages are Hindi, Urdu (which closely resembles Hindi), (…).

 

Katzner Kenneth, The languages of the world, Routledge 2002

(p.18) The Turkic languages are a homogeneous group of about 20 languages, which are for the most part mutually intelligible.

 

(p.22) The Sino-Tibetan family of more than 200 languages.

 

(p.28) In Morocco you have Berber languages: Tachelhit, Tamazight, Riff. In Algeria: Kabyle and Tamashek in the South.

(p.29) The Berber languages are quite similar to each other, so much so that some authorities often speak of a single Berber language.

 

(p.25) The Papuan languages do not sem to belong to a single family. There are more than 1,000 of these languages.

(p.26) The Australian languages are about 150.

(p.26) The Niger-Congo languages are over a thousand.

 

(p.30) Over a hundred Indian languages are spoken in the United States and canada, over three hundred in Mexico and Central America, and perhaps a thousand in South America.

 

 

 

 

Language families of the world  (Katzner,2002,2)

 

Family

subgroup

branch

languages

Indo-European

Germanic:

11 languages

Western

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern

(Scandinavian)

English

German

Dutch

Frisian,

Luxembourgian

Yiddish*

Afrikaans

Danish

Norwegian

Swedish

Faeroese

Romance :

10 languages

 

 

Spanish

Portuguese

French

Italian

Romanian (Moldovan)

Walloon

Catalan

Occitan

Rhaeto-Romanic

Sardinian

Slavic (or Slavonic) :

11 languages

 

Russian

Ukrainian

Belorussian

Polish

Czech

Slovak

Bulgarian

Serbo-Croatian

Slovenian

Macedonian 

Sorbian (Lusatian)

 

Michel Malherbe  , Les langages de l’humanité, Une encyclopédie des 3000 langues parlées dans le monde, éd. Laffont, 1995

 

(p.135) LES FAMILLES DE LANGUES INDO-EUROPEENNES

 

Les péripéties de l’histoire ont rapproché ou éloigné certains peuples indo-euro­péens qui ont ainsi pris une originalité linguistique relative. On peut ainsi distin­guer à présent des groupes beaucoup plus homogènes à l’intérieur du vaste ensemble indo-européen. Ces distinctions nous sont familières. On trouve :

Les langues latines, auxquelles appartiennent le français, mais aussi le portugais, l’espagnol, le catalan, l’occitan, le franco-provençal, le corse, l’italien, le roman­che, le sarde, le roumain…

Les langues germaniques, avec l’anglais, l’allemand, le néerlandais, l’afrikaans, l’alsacien, et les langues Scandinaves (danois, norvégien, suédois, islandais, féroé).

Les langues celtes, avec le breton, l’irlandais, le gallois et l’écossais.

Les langues slaves, avec le tchèque, le slovaque, le polonais, le russe, le biélo­russe, l’ukrainien, le bulgare, le Slovène, le serbo-croate…

Les langues baltes, peut-être les plus proches de l’ancien indo-européen : letton et lituanien.

Des langues isolées, quoique aussi nettement indo-européennes que les autres, telles que l’albanais, le grec, l’arménien, le tsigane.

Les langues iraniennes : persan (farsi), kurde, baloutche, poshtou, tadjik…

Les langues de l’Inde du Nord : hindi-ourdou, sindhi, pandjabi, konkani, oriya, nepali, assamais, bengali, marathi, gujrati — et le singhalais du Sri Lanka, qui appartient à ce groupe tout en étant géographiquement isolé.

Chacun de ces sous-ensembles ajoute aux caractéristiques communes d’autres points communs, qui rendent la parenté plus étroite. On touche là l’une des difficultés du classement des langues par les linguistes, qui peuvent être plus ou moins exigeants dans leur définition des critères de parenté : il existe des raisons indiscutables de considérer le français et le singhalais comme deux langues de la même famille indo-euro­péenne, mais, s’il n’existait pas la longue chaîne des langues intermé­diaires qui les relie, cette parenté serait moins évidente et elle ne peut se comparer avec celle qui unit le français à l’espagnol…

Il a paru utile de passer rapidement quelques-unes de ces langues en revue dans ce chapitre pour faire apparaître leurs particularités et parfois leur histoire

 

Louis-Jean Calvet, Les langues véhiculaires, in : PUF 1981

 

(p.34) Le versant linguistique de la politique coloniale a toujours consisté, dans les possessions françaises d’Afrique, à imposer le français comme seule langue d’enseignement et d’administration. Les langues locales, que l’on baptisait d’ailleurs le plus souvent « dialectes », n’étaient nulle part prises en compte et certains s’attachaient même à démontrer leur infériorité. En outre, si l’on exclut les efforts un peu désordonnés et dispersés des missionnaires (qui enseignaient souvent le catéchisme en langues lo­cales mais utilisaient pour ce faire des orthographes fantaisistes), ces langues n’étaient même pas écrites : personne ne se préoccupait de leur donner un alpha­bet adéquat, en relation avec leur phonologie propre. De ce point de vue, donc, la langue colo­niale fonctionnait comme une « langue dominante », quoique largement minoritaire du point de vue de ses locuteurs et, pour revenir à notre sujet, le manding se trouvait du côté des « langues dominées », bien qu’il fût largement majoritaire.

 

(p.48) Il faut ajouter à tout cela la diffusion du swahili dans les colonies belges, Zaïre et Ruanda-Urundi, pour des raisons commerciales (création par un marchand d’origine arabe, Tippu Tip, en 1866, de comptoirs commerciaux et d’exploitations agricoles sur le Congo), militaires (recrutement par Léopold II de troupes à Zanzibar) et industrielles (embauche de travailleurs du Nord-Est, parlant swahili, dans les mines du Katanga.

(p.51) Le quichua est une langue aujourd’hui parlée par environ dix millions de locuteurs le long de la Cordillère des Andes. Il est présent dans six pays d’Amérique latine : le Pérou, l’Equateur et la Bolivie de façon fréquente et large, à quoi il faut ajouter une portion des territoires colombien, argentin et chilien. Le nom sous lequel la langue est aujourd’hui connue n’apparaît qu’au xvie siècle (dans le dic­tionnaire d’Antonio Ricardo, Arte y vocabulario de la lengua général del Peru llamada Quichua, 1586), mais le mot en question désigne en fait les régions tempérées situées entre les régions hautes et froides des Andes et les vallées chaudes. Lorsque les Espa­gnols arrivèrent à Cuzco, située dans la région « Quichua », ils baptisèrent la langue du lieu lengua de los quichuas pour la distinguer de l’aymara, parlé plus haut.

Les locuteurs de la langue, pour leur part, l’ap­pellent runa-shimi, expression généralement tra­duite par « langue des hommes ». Ernst Middendorf soutient cependant une thèse selon laquelle runa (p.52) ne signifiait pas à l’origine « homme », mais plutôt « sujet » ou « vassal ». Runa-shimi désignerait alors la « langue du peuple », par opposition à une Inca-shimi, « langue des nobles » qui, selon l’auteur, se serait perdue depuis la conquête (1).

Quoi qu’il en soit, la grande dispersion géogra­phique de la langue a bien entendu entraîné une dialectalisation assez importante, elle linguiste péru­vien Alfredo Torero distingue trente-sept variétés dialectales de quichua qu’il ramène à deux grands groupes et trois noms génériques :

quichua   I ou huayhuash

quichua II ou yungay chinchay

 

(p.83) C’est-à-dire qu’une décision d’ordre politique et qui n’avait en 1928, lorsqu’elle fut prise, pas les moyens de cette politique (l’heure était alors à la lutte et non pas à la planification linguistique) a pu transformer la situation d’une langue, la faisant len­tement passer du statut véhiculaire limité aux ports au statut de langue nationale à vocation majoritaire.

 

(p.93) Dans un article célèbre consacré à la « diglossie » (8), Charles Ferguson écrivait que l’on peut considérer une langue A comme « plus simple » qu’une langue B si :

–  le système morpho-phonémique de A est plus régulier que celui de B ;

–  il y a moins de catégories soumises à accord (en genre,  en nombre,  en classes…) dans A que dans B ;

–  les paradigmes de A (les paradigmes verbaux par exemple) sont plus réguliers que ceux de B ;

– l’accord et la rection sont plus stricts dans A que dans B.

 

(8) Diglossia, in : Wrd, vol.15, 1959, p.325-340

 

(p.105) L’exemple de l’Ouganda illustre bien les pro­blèmes qui apparaissent dans ce type de situations. Le pays s’est officiellement donné trois langues nationales (swahili, luganda, anglais), chacune d’entre elles correspondant en fait à des fonctions et à des secteurs d’activités bien différenciés :

—  l’anglais est utilisé dans la vie officielle, l’admi­nistration,  la justice, l’enseignement  après la quatrième année de primaire, etc. ;

—  le swahili, considéré comme la langue des gens peu instruits, est surtout parlé par les commer­çants et les agricultueurs, mais est aussi la langue officielle de l’armée et de la police (trace de l’époque coloniale) ;

—  le luganda est enseigné dans les écoles secon­daires de la partie bantoue du pays et doit son statut de langue nationale au fait qu’il est parlé dans la capitale.

Mais ces trois langues ne suffisent nullement à régler tous les problèmes de communication du pays et l’on assiste à une situation curieuse, car les diffé­rents ministères ont choisi, pour leurs actions en direction de la population, des langues qui ne correspondent pas :

—  le ministère de la Culture a retenu huit langues locales pour ses campagnes d’alphabétisation ;

—  le   ministère   de   l’Information   a   choisi   seize langues  locales   pour  les   émissions   de  radio, auxquelles s’ajoutent l’anglais et l’hindi (pour les émissions en direction de la forte minorité de commerçants indiens) ;

(p.106) —  le ministère de l’Agriculture, qui touche 80 % de la population, publie des textes en quatre langues locales ;

—  enfin, le ministère de l’Education nationale a reconnu six langues locales pour l’enseignement dans les quatres  premières  années  de l’école primaire, avant que l’on ne passe, à partir de la cinquième année, à l’anglais.

Ainsi il est fort possible par exemple qu’un enfant soit alphabétisé à l’école dans une langue et que ses parents soient alphabétisés dans une autre langue ou encore qu’ils reçoivent du ministère de l’Agri­culture une documentation technique dans une troisième langue… Cette situation paradoxale tient bien entendu au fait que, d’une part, l’anglais hérité de la période coloniale n’est parlé que par une petite partie de la population et que, d’autre part, il n’existe pas de langue locale capable d’unifier le pays linguistiquement (le swahili n’est langue véhi-culaire que sur une partie du territoire).

Ailleurs, au contraire du cas de l’Ouganda, les langues officielles peu parlées coexistent avec une langue véhiculaire qui pourrait, elle, répondre réel­lement au problème de la communication populaire : l’anglais au Kenya, face au swahili, ou le français en Côte-d’Ivoire, face au jula…

 

de la langue d’une partie de la population, devenue par rapport de force langue véhiculaire puis langue nationale, la langue de tous.

 

(p.111) Le facteur idéologique a joué dans ce processus un rôle non négligeable. En effet, la tendance a toujours été en France à distinguer soigneusement (p.112) entre les « langues » (le français bien sûr et quelques autres langues européennes) et les « dialectes » ou les « patois ». Le passage suivant, extrait du rapport Grégoire à la Convention, est de ce point de vue significatif:

« Il n’y a qu’environ quinze départements de l’intérieur où la langue française soit exclusivement parlée ; encore y éprouve-t-elle des altérations sensibles, soit dans la pronon­ciation, soit par l’emploi de termes impropres et surannés, surtout vers Sancerre où l’on retrouve une partie des expres­sions de Rabelais, Amyot et Montaigne.

Nous n’avons plus de provinces, et nous avons encore en­viron trente patois qui en rappellent les noms. Peut-être n’est-il pas inutile d’en faire l’énumération : le bas-breton, le normand, le Picard, le rouchi ou wallon, le flamand, le champenois, le messin, le lorrain, le franc-comtois, le bourguignon, le bressan, le lyonnais, le dauphinois, l’auvergnat, le poitevin, le limousin, le Picard, le provençal, le languedocien, le velayen, le catalan, le béarnais, le basque, le rouergat et le gascon, ce dernier seul est parlé sur une surface de 60 lieues eu tous sens.

Au nombre des patois, on doit placer encore l’italien de la Corse, des Alpes-Maritimes, et l’allemand des Haut et Bas-Rhin, parce que ces deux idiomes y sont très dégénérés.

Enfin les nègres de nos colonies, dont vous avez fait des hommes, ont une espèce d’idiome pauvre comme celui des Hottentots, comme la langue franque, qui dans tous les verbes ne connaît guère que l’infinitif » (5).

 

 (5) Michel de certeau et al., op. cit., pp. 301-302.

 

(p.113) Cette opposition entre dialectes et langues, qui peut comme nous venons de la voir mener aux pires absurdités taxinomiques (le breton, le basque ou l’italien classés comme patois), trouve sa source aux frontières assez floues qui séparent la science de l’idéologie. A l’origine, le mot dialecte désigne le parler d’une région ou d’une province, mais la différence postulée par son existence même ne va intéresser les linguistes qu’à partir de la fin du XIXe siècle, lorsque Georges Wenker entame en 1876 les études qui le mèneront à la publication de son Sprachatlas des deutschen Reichs et que Jules Gilliéron entame en 1898 celles qui le mèneront à la publication de son Atlas linguistique de la France. Ferdinand de Saussure n’en déclare pas moins qu’ « il est difficile de dire en quoi consiste la diffé­rence entre une langue et un dialecte » (6), tandis qu’Antoine Meillet tente d’être plus précis :

« A l’intérieur d’un groupe linguistique étendu, on constate, en général, que certains parlers offrent des traits communs et que les sujets parlants de certaines régions ont le sentiment d’appartenir à un même sous-groupe : en pareil cas, on dit que ces parlers font partie d’un même dialecte » (7).

 

 (6)  Cours de linguistique générale, p. 278.

(7) Linguistique historique et linguistique générale, t. 2, p. 67.

 

Quelques cartes

(in: Roland Breton, Atlas des langues du monde, éd. Autrement, 2003)

Translate »
Share This